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2015/16 Cities: CitySpace

In 2015-16, instead of focusing on individual cities or regions, the IAH will examine theories and practices of city space. From Jane Jacobs’ groundbreaking The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), and its searing critique of postwar urban planning, to the success of New York’s High Line reclamation project, the question of how cities use, misuse, and depend on public space has been of paramount concern– to planners, architects, residents, tourists, and everyone who cares about the quality of urban life around the globe. Over the course of the year, we will explore that question in five diverse and interdisciplinary presentations.

Events

Fall 2015

Sep 17, 2015

7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
SEE AND BE SEEN Re-engagement with the Public Domain
 
- James Wines, Professor of Architecture at Penn State University and President of SITE New York

This presentation focuses on the need for contemporary public space to communicate on social, psychological and contextual levels, in response to the present Age of Information and Ecology. As an alternative to those ubiquitous slabs of concrete, lollypop trees and ‘plop art’ sculptures - associated with industrial age traditions inherited from the 1920s and 30s – the lecture content proposes a design approach where people interaction becomes as much a part of the raw material of conceptual development as paving surfaces and landscape features.

 

Nov 12, 2015

7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Housing Transformations/Community Considerations - Panel Discussion: Private Space and Public Rights

- Lisa Domenica Iulo, Associate Professor of Architecture at Penn State

Housing is conceptualized at a global scale using Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, United Nations Housing Rights Programme and the Habitat Agenda as the starting point, compared with housing policies in the United States.

- Alexandra Staub, Associate Professor of Architecture at Penn State

The history of housing policy, with a focus on energy-conscious, “sustainable” development and community resilience.

- Mallika Bose, Associate Professor of landscape Architecture at Penn State

Speculative housing producers and the real estate and home improvement industries create aspirational frameworks that,
while they benet individual industries, are socially and economically wholly unsustainable.

 

Spring 2016

Feb 18, 2016

7:00 p.m. – 112 Borland Building
From Atrium to Open Plan: Frank Lloyd Wright and Interior Space in Chicago, Oak Park, and Buffalo
 
- Craig Zabel, Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Art History at Penn State

This presentation focuses on the need for contemporary public space to communicate on social, psychological and contextual levels, in response to the present Age of Information and Ecology. As an alternative to those ubiquitous slabs of concrete, lollypop trees and ‘plop art’ sculptures - associated with industrial age traditions inherited from the 1920s and 30s – the lecture content proposes a design approach where people interaction becomes as much a part of the raw material of conceptual development as paving surfaces and landscape features.

 

Mar 24, 2016

7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
StoryWalks: Walking as place Making Methodology in San Jose Japantown, California 
 
- Kimberly Powell, Associate Professor of Education and Art Education

Walking has increasingly been adopted by artists and social scientists as a means to develop socially engaged, community-based practice and research. Drawing from her work in the cultural and historical district of San Jose Japantown (CA), an area affected by the Japanese American internment experience of World War II, Dr. Powell’s research focuses on the ways in which walking as a sensory experience facilitates memory, biography, and identity as emplaced, and the ways in which walking as a methodology is an orientation toward an ontology of being in the making, one that is comprised of space, place, and material encounters.

 

Mar 24, 2016

7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
StoryWalks: Walking as place Making Methodology in San Jose Japantown, California 
 
- Kimberly Powell, Associate Professor of Education and Art Education

Walking has increasingly been adopted by artists and social scientists as a means to develop socially engaged, community-based practice and research. Drawing from her work in the cultural and historical district of San Jose Japantown (CA), an area affected by the Japanese American internment experience of World War II, Dr. Powell’s research focuses on the ways in which walking as a sensory experience facilitates memory, biography, and identity as emplaced, and the ways in which walking as a methodology is an orientation toward an ontology of being in the making, one that is comprised of space, place, and material encounters.

 

Apr 21, 2016

7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Performing the City: Imagining Istanbul
 
- Serap Erincin, Postdoctoral Scholar, Institute for the Arts and Humanities

Gezi Park protests emerged as an act of environmentalist activism with the goal of protecting a littlepark in Taksim square, the center of Istanbul – the heartbeat of Turkey. Gezi quickly became part of bigger environmentalist and social movements, e.g. often also referred to as Occupy Gezi. In addition to oppressive police action and silent mainstream media, Gezi was marked by creative humor embodied in memes and performatives in graffiti and cartoons all over the city. Here I discuss the role of art in environmentalist protest. This talk also considers how apparitions of Istanbul as a character in various artistic forms, e.g. in Nobel Prize recipient Orhan Pamuk’s novels, international plays, Cannes’ Palme D’or winner Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s movies, Nazim Hikmet’s poetry contributes to imagining the city and its inhabitants.