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A Song, A Slogan, and A Service: Dispatches from the Movement for Black Lives – James Braxton Peterson (Public Lecture: Truth & Reconciliation)

When Oct 05, 2015
from 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Where The Attic Room of the State Theatre
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James Braxton Peterson
Director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of English, Lehigh University

James Braxton Peterson is the Director of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University.  His first book, The Hip Hop Underground and African American Culture was published on Palgrave Macmillan press (2014). Peterson hosts “The Remix” on Philadelphia’s NPR affiliate, WHYY.  “The Remix” is a podcast that engages issues at the intersection of race, politics, and popular culture. Peterson has written for the Huffington Post, The Guardian, Reuters, and The Daily Beast.  He is currently an MSNBC contributor and has appeared on MSNBC, Al-Jazeera, CNN, HLN, Fox News, and other networks as an expert on race, politics, and popular culture.

A Song, A Slogan, and A Service: Dispatches from the Movement for Black Lives

This brief talk will provide several updates and insights on the Black Lives Matter movement. 1) The adoption of Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright” from his 2015 To Pimp A Butterfly album as an anthem for the Black Lives Matter movement marries the rapper’s prophetic voice to the Hip Hop generation’s emergence as social activists.  2) One troubling and persistent feature of the Black Lives Matter movement is the challenge to pursue equal justice for women and members of the LGBTQ community.  #SayHerName is a movement within the movement that’s challenging the blind spots of Black social justice efforts in the 21st century.  3) While many were organizing around the one-year anniversary of the murder of Michael Brown and the 50-year anniversary of the incredibly prescient Watts Uprising, I attended church service at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.  The cameras are gone; the media is gone, but the pain and devastation remain.